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Mozart's Third Brain
Literary Studies


Series Information
The Margellos World Republic of Letters

Mozart's Third Brain

  • Göran Sonnevi; Translation, Preface, and Notes by Rika Lesser; Foreword by Rosanna Warren
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Reviews

“This ambitious, sprawling book-length poem from one of Sweden’s leading lights aspires to consider almost everything. . . . Sonnevi’s sentences sound admirably idiomatic in Lesser’s rendering.”—Publishers Weekly

“A massive poem that breaks almost every poetic convention. . . .The poem lures us, step by step, to suffer, to care, to mourn, and to live in an enlarged state of awareness. So large, finally, that it brings microcosm together with macrocosm, and brokenness together with wholeness, in a visionary ending that does not really end. . . . In this majestic, original, and painful poem, Göran Sonnevi has released a new form of fertility into the world.”—Rosanna Warren, from the Foreword

“Göran Sonnevi is one of the most unique and most accomplished poets writing anywhere in the world. There is no one like him in terms of the scope, the magnificence of his ambition for his work, and few come close to what he can technically manage…Brilliantly translated, Rika Lesser’s verse in English is supple and capacious.”—C.K. Williams

“Göran Sonnevi tries in this book something that’s impossible and breathtaking: a poetic synthesis wherein our knowledge and emotions should merge. . . A synthesis is not possible but what we’re given here is a wonderful meditation on the world of pain and beauty, of politics and music, nature and human relationships. A fantastic poem and fantastically translated by Rika Lesser!”— Adam Zagajewski

“Just what we need, another poem that can never stop being read, only entered, continued, lived. . . Lesser (what a name for the translator of the latest “wisdom literature” to hit the fan!) had to hear Sonnevi’s voice before she could (or would) do the work. In other words, loved the poem. And that is why we may read it, not well but as well: to hear the voice, in English now: entered, continued, lived. . . Yes, just what we need.”—Richard Howard

"Sonnevi mentions stochastics at several points to draw attention to this random organizing principle. Free-flowing consciousness mixes with personal anecdote to create the dynamic flow of the poem."—Walter R. Holland, Pleiades

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